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Author Topic: Questions about Canon 1014
Gabriel Bly
Junior
Posts: 8
From: Lakewood, OH, USA
Registered: Jan 2019


 - posted March 12, 2019 02:54 PM      Profile for Gabriel Bly   Email Gabriel Bly   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hey guys! I'm a bit new to cameras and I just purchased a really amazing canon 1014 which is in great condition. I have 2 questions regarding this camera:

1. As I am going to be shooting on expired film, I have read that one must set the exposure super high to get enough light. I'm having a bit of difficulty understanding the exposure settings on this camera, can anyone who has this camera help?

2. The second question is about the remote trigger. Is there something still manufactured that I can use for this?

Thank you!

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Leon Norris
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 526
From: Elkins Park, PA, USA
Registered: Jun 2012


 - posted March 12, 2019 04:45 PM      Profile for Leon Norris   Email Leon Norris   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Gabriel, did you get a manual with the camera?

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Gabriel Bly
Junior
Posts: 8
From: Lakewood, OH, USA
Registered: Jan 2019


 - posted March 13, 2019 04:03 PM      Profile for Gabriel Bly   Email Gabriel Bly   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Yes, I do have the manual. However, it's still a bit confusing to a novice such as myself.

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Jason Patnode
Film Handler

Posts: 45
From: Zephyr Cove, NV, USA
Registered: Jul 2017


 - posted March 13, 2019 04:14 PM      Profile for Jason Patnode   Author's Homepage   Email Jason Patnode   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Do you have the 1014 electric or the 1014xls? I have the 1014xls. I can check the exposure settings when I get home and let you know, if you haven't figured it out by then. Unfortunately I'm out of town working until Saturday so can't check until then.

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Jason Patnode

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Gabriel Bly
Junior
Posts: 8
From: Lakewood, OH, USA
Registered: Jan 2019


 - posted March 13, 2019 04:25 PM      Profile for Gabriel Bly   Email Gabriel Bly   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I have the 1014 electric

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Jason Patnode
Film Handler

Posts: 45
From: Zephyr Cove, NV, USA
Registered: Jul 2017


 - posted March 14, 2019 05:25 AM      Profile for Jason Patnode   Author's Homepage   Email Jason Patnode   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I haven't picked up a 1014e in ages. I can check to see if we might have one around here at work. In the meantime, I dug around done and found some info for the camera just in case.

The needle shows the aperture as selected by the meter.

The 1014, unusually for Super-8, has a variable shutter angle and this is what the 2 and 4 are about- you adjust the angle with the knob, to 2 or 4, then compensate the exposure by moving the switch to 2 or 4 to match.

A setting of 2 halves the shutter angle, 4 reduces it to one quarter. Each reduces the exposure by one stop, so you move the switch and the aperture opens up correspondingly.

If you are getting overexposure in daylight, you can use this adjustment to get a wider aperture and get out of the red. That would surprise me though because normal exposure for bright sunlight at 24fps with 40ISO should only be about f16-22. I would check the meter.

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Jason Patnode

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Shane C. Collins
Film Handler

Posts: 62
From: Williamsport, PA, USA
Registered: Oct 2016


 - posted March 15, 2019 08:48 AM      Profile for Shane C. Collins   Email Shane C. Collins   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If your new to Super 8 it's a good idea to learn as much as you can about F-Stops, and what those aperture numbers mean. It will teach you how to not only shoot in manual mode, but to also understand how the camera is responding to light when the automatic exposure system is used. When I'm shooting Super 8 I always use the auto exposure setting. I have found if the camera's meter is working properly, my results are always good.
Here's the most elementary way to understand F-Stops. The lower the number the wider the aperture. For example an F1.8 will open the aperture to allow more light to hit the film. An F16 will close the aperture down to decrease the amount of light hitting the film. If your shooting at the beach, for example, it's not uncommon to see an F16 or F22 in the viewfinder. When I'm shooting under these situations I always use a Neutral Density X4 filter. This cuts down the light and also allows the camera to use a better F-Stop. Depending on the film's ASA rating, and it's sensitivity those higher F-Stops will cause the image to be less sharp. As I mentioned the ND filter will allow you to obtain a sharper image because the camera will meter to a lower aperture setting. I found my Super 8 movies always look better when the aperture is lower than F11. In the old days when Kodachrome 25 was the rage people commonly used the "Sunny 16" rule. Google that and you'll see what I'm talking about. Hope some of this helps.

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Projectors: Elmo FP8-C, Sankyo Dualux 2000H!

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