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Author Topic: Canon 518 film cart removal
Stu Brill
Junior
Posts: 3
From: Sherborne, Dorset, UK
Registered: Jan 2017


 - posted January 11, 2017 04:59 AM      Profile for Stu Brill   Author's Homepage   Email Stu Brill   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hope you can help. I have found my father's old Canon 518 Super8, and it has a film cartridge in it. Of the 50 feet it looks like 20 feet have been shot.
I'd like to get the film developed but am worried about fogging the film, do I need to run it fully to the end somehow? If so can this be done manually, as the camera no longer works.
Many thanks for any help.

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Maurice Leakey
Film God

Posts: 5636
From: Bristol. United Kingdom
Registered: Oct 2007


 - posted January 11, 2017 05:03 AM      Profile for Maurice Leakey   Email Maurice Leakey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Stu
Only the film in the gate area, approximately 1 inch, will be fogged when the cartridge is removed.
The rest of the exposed (and not exposed film) will be within the light free cartridge.

--------------------
Maurice

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Stu Brill
Junior
Posts: 3
From: Sherborne, Dorset, UK
Registered: Jan 2017


 - posted January 11, 2017 07:42 AM      Profile for Stu Brill   Author's Homepage   Email Stu Brill   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Excellent, thanks Maurice.
I'll remove it, and search for somewhere to send it to develop it, I've no idea what he shot as it was last used in the eighties.

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Paul Browning
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 993
From: West Midlands United Kingdom
Registered: Aug 2011


 - posted January 11, 2017 12:08 PM      Profile for Paul Browning   Email Paul Browning   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Gauge film in Dudley west midlands develop film, but it does depend on the film type, as some chemicals are no longer available. Check EBAY as they do advertise on there. Good luck Stu, I hope you find some memorable footage.

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Alexander Vandeputte
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 243
From: Belgium
Registered: Nov 2009


 - posted January 11, 2017 02:07 PM      Profile for Alexander Vandeputte   Email Alexander Vandeputte   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If the camera still functions. Use the rest of the film before you develop it [Smile]

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Tom Spielman
Master Film Handler

Posts: 339
From: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Registered: Apr 2016


 - posted January 11, 2017 04:45 PM      Profile for Tom Spielman   Email Tom Spielman   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I agree with Alexander. If you know who might be in the film, get some shots of them 30 years later. It will make for a nice "then and now" theme. It's going to cost the same to process it whether you shoot the rest of the film or not.

The new footage may not turn out as well given the age of the film, but it won't hurt anything to try.

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Rob Young.
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1594
From: Cheshire, U.K.
Registered: Dec 2003


 - posted January 11, 2017 04:48 PM      Profile for Rob Young.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Stu, if you can tell us what film stock is in there then that would help with how to develop it.

The stock should be readable through a small side window in the door which closes over the cartridge (K40, for example).

Failing that, as Maurice points out, opening the door to have a look at the markings on the cartridge will do no harm to the stock as it is light sealed.

But, yes, if the camera is working then why not shoot the rest!

Kodachrome stock may be a difficult one to process if that is what is in there, but I'm sure our knowledgeable members here can advise, even if the only outcome is a B&W reversal.

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Ty Reynolds
Film Handler

Posts: 92
From: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Registered: Nov 2015


 - posted January 11, 2017 06:49 PM      Profile for Ty Reynolds   Author's Homepage   Email Ty Reynolds   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If it is Kodachrome, it might be worth it to wait and see if Kodak actually does bring that stock back. Then you could get yours processed in colour (although probably highly faded).

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Stu Brill
Junior
Posts: 3
From: Sherborne, Dorset, UK
Registered: Jan 2017


 - posted January 12, 2017 06:28 AM      Profile for Stu Brill   Author's Homepage   Email Stu Brill   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
For your interest, this is what Dad left me.
I'm going to try to eject the film, (Kodak Ektachrome G160).
Also there is a fim in the reel projector so I'll see if I cn get that working and have a look at it. Thanks for the help guys.

 -

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Rob Young.
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1594
From: Cheshire, U.K.
Registered: Dec 2003


 - posted January 12, 2017 06:53 AM      Profile for Rob Young.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Ektachrome is developed using E-6 process, Stu, a more common process and not the specialised (and pretty much defunct) Kodachrome process.

So that's the good news, although the film will certainly have suffered something called latent image regression, whereby it has faded - the degree to which can only be discovered by having it developed.

I haven't had any super 8 processed for 6 years now, so I'm sure more up to date members can advise on processing.

I know The Widescreen Centre used to do super 8 E-6, although Ektachrome 160 is now a long discontinued stock, so you will have to speak to them.

https://www.widescreen-centre.co.uk/taxonomy/term/22/products

Good luck with it!

As I say, I'm sure other members can advise further...

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Graham Sinden
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1112
From: Kent, UK
Registered: Aug 2005


 - posted January 12, 2017 07:07 AM      Profile for Graham Sinden   Email Graham Sinden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Many years ago I tried getting some Ektachrome 160 processed at the Widescreen centre and was told that it cant be processed like the regular Ektachrome 125 at the time as the temperature is not correct. Im not sure but I think its E4 not E6, and the Widescreen centre said it would just be sent back. I think you will have to go to a specialist developer and pay a fair bit of money. Maybe someone can verify this.

Graham S

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Rob Young.
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1594
From: Cheshire, U.K.
Registered: Dec 2003


 - posted January 12, 2017 08:07 AM      Profile for Rob Young.     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Oh yes, I think you are right Graham...this has jarred my memory as I once tried to get some 160 type G processed at my local photo shop as a kid back in the mid 1990's and they returned it unprocessed, even though they had always handled it before.

Now I think about it, it may even be EM-26 processing.

Sorry if this seems bad news Stu. Hopefully other forum members can help more.

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Bill Phelps
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1464
From: USA
Registered: Jan 2009


 - posted January 12, 2017 10:09 AM      Profile for Bill Phelps     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Film rescue in the USA can develop it color positive or b&w positive and usually get better results as b&w. Hope that helps.

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Tom Spielman
Master Film Handler

Posts: 339
From: Minneapolis, MN, USA
Registered: Apr 2016


 - posted January 12, 2017 12:06 PM      Profile for Tom Spielman   Email Tom Spielman   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This thread in another forum discusses processing that type of film: http://photo.net/film-and-processing-forum/00ShzM It includes comments from the guy who created the process.

Having developed some of my own film recently what I've learned is that pretty much anything can be processed but you might be stuck with black and white or less than perfect color.

And the trick is finding somebody that will do it, though there definitely are people who will. This forum has many smart people in it but not many here shoot film anymore. It's mostly collectors. You may have more luck finding someone to process your film by asking in filmshooting.com or other sites that deal with shooting and processing film.

The other thing I will say is that it's not particularly tricky. It's very similar to more common processes. The problem it has this layer called rem Jet that has to be removed. Most places that process film these days won't touch it because they don't want the rem jet contaminating their chemicals which they generally use many times before having to refresh them.

Good luck!

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