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Author Topic: The Great Gatsby
Paul Adsett
Film God

Posts: 4815
From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 10, 2013 08:05 AM      Profile for Paul Adsett     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The new The Great Gatsby with Leo DiCapprio is not getting good reviews at all. Just two stars in the local review.
Apparently it is high on 3D glitz and low on character and dialogue, and the music is totally out of context for the 1920's period.
We watched the Robert Redford/Mia Farrow version a couple of nights ago, and I thought it was very good, and certainly a beautiful film to look at. But from what I read the best version so far might be the 1949 version with, believe it or not, Alan Ladd. Apparently Ladd does a great job, although I have never seen this version.

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Allan Broadfield
Master Film Handler

Posts: 449
From: Bromley, Kent
Registered: Nov 2010


 - posted May 10, 2013 10:37 AM      Profile for Allan Broadfield   Author's Homepage   Email Allan Broadfield   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Saw the Alan Ladd version as a child and remember being quite shocked by the last scene where Ladd was shot by the swimming pool. Amazing considering I would have been five! I've seen since on TV, but having never seen any other versions couldn't compare.

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Joe Caruso
Film God

Posts: 4020
From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 10, 2013 11:42 AM      Profile for Joe Caruso   Email Joe Caruso   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Maybe I'll save using my union card for this Fitzgerald Fiasco - I constantlt say these films should NOT be re-made with people of little talent for them

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Guy Taylor, Jr.
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 606
From: Galveston, Texas, U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2007


 - posted May 10, 2013 02:10 PM      Profile for Guy Taylor, Jr.   Email Guy Taylor, Jr.   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This was made by the same guy that made Moulan Rouge. He likes adding modern music to period pieces.

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Guy Taylor

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Thomas Murin, Jr.
Master Film Handler

Posts: 260
From: Lanoka Harbor, NJ, USA
Registered: Sep 2009


 - posted May 10, 2013 04:33 PM      Profile for Thomas Murin, Jr.   Author's Homepage   Email Thomas Murin, Jr.   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Baz Lhurman also had Romeo & Juliet set in the 1990's with rap music and rival gangs but the actors all speaking Shakespeare's text. I haven't seen it so can't say how well it works.

I liked Moulin Rouge and expect to like Gatsby.

BTW, Francis Ford Coppola, who wrote the 1974 version of Gatsby, was a consultant and did some uncredited writing on the new version.

Anachronistic music in period pieces is nothing new. Ladyhawke is set in the 1300's and has a hard rock score. Plunkett & Macleane, also set in medieval times, features rock songs on the soundtrack.

Personally, I like it when a filmaker actually uses his imagination and gets creative. Even if the end result does not really work, the effort remains interesting.

BTW, the 1949 version is considered the WORST adaptation of the novel though most like Alan Ladd's performance. Haven't seen it myself so I can't say.

I did enjoy the 1974 version very much and am looking forward to the new movie.

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Hugh Thompson Scott
Film God

Posts: 3063
From: Gt. Clifton,Cumbria,England
Registered: Jan 2012


 - posted May 10, 2013 04:46 PM      Profile for Hugh Thompson Scott   Email Hugh Thompson Scott       Edit/Delete Post 
Have to agree with Joe,some films just don't need a remake,
although the subject is not to my taste, the Robert Redford film is now regarded as a classic and is going to be a tough act to follow.

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Paul Adsett
Film God

Posts: 4815
From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 10, 2013 06:17 PM      Profile for Paul Adsett     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I just saw a clip from the Alan Ladd version on youtube. I must say that Ladd looks impressive in the role, I wish the film would be released on DVD.

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Guy Taylor, Jr.
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 606
From: Galveston, Texas, U.S.A.
Registered: Mar 2007


 - posted May 10, 2013 11:07 PM      Profile for Guy Taylor, Jr.   Email Guy Taylor, Jr.   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I like Moulan Rouge as well. Will give this movie a try.

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Guy Taylor

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Michael O'Regan
Film God

Posts: 3083
From: Essex, UK
Registered: Oct 2007


 - posted May 11, 2013 12:54 PM      Profile for Michael O'Regan   Email Michael O'Regan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Gatsby is a book that just cannot be done justice to on the screen.That's always been my opinion anyway.
[Smile]

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Joe Caruso
Film God

Posts: 4020
From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 13, 2013 05:16 AM      Profile for Joe Caruso   Email Joe Caruso   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
caught it last night, long, should have been more concise

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Allan Broadfield
Master Film Handler

Posts: 449
From: Bromley, Kent
Registered: Nov 2010


 - posted May 14, 2013 04:09 PM      Profile for Allan Broadfield   Author's Homepage   Email Allan Broadfield   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Talking of Gatsby raised my interest again, and I just ran an off air recording I made long ago of the Alan Ladd version. It's very much of it's time, and a fairly typical piece of Hollywood film noir, and quite haunting in it's own way. Ladd gives his usual tough but vulnerable performance.

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Laksmi Breathwaite
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 771
From: Las Vegas
Registered: Nov 2010


 - posted May 14, 2013 07:30 PM      Profile for Laksmi Breathwaite   Email Laksmi Breathwaite   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I liked the colorful parties and Spiderman Toby. But Gatsby's worth the whole Dam group of all of them put together!

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David Kilderry
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 963
From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Registered: Feb 2006


 - posted May 16, 2013 06:33 AM      Profile for David Kilderry   Author's Homepage   Email David Kilderry   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
The people want to see it; it's taking big bucks for a period piece.

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David M. Ballew
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 113
From: Burbank, CA USA
Registered: Nov 2009


 - posted May 16, 2013 01:52 PM      Profile for David M. Ballew   Email David M. Ballew   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I saw this movie two nights ago. I thought it was perfectly awful.

The cutting, camera movements, and even on occasion the shutter speed of the camera created a manic and disjointed impression that did not complement the themes of the story, though that may have been their intended purpose.

The film looked like it had been production designed by the late Thomas Kinkade. I don't mean that in a good way.

Although I am a huge 3-D fan, the stereoscopy in this film left me cold. I wound up watching maybe 40% of the film without my glasses, just to get a better sense of what was going on with regards to the stereo. I can tell you, their team made some inexplicable choices. While there were no textbook technical errors, the aesthetics of the 3-D were lacking. Some individual shots looked as beautiful as anything I've ever seen. Others looked as flat as a marble table.

If you were to watch the film projected in 3-D but without your 3-D glasses on, as I did, you would notice that many close-ups and medium shots have a sufficient but limited amount of parallax (that is, image disparity or "doubling"). But long shots, for some baffling reason, have almost no parallax. A few shots had no parallax whatsoever, making them 2-D.

As a long-time stereo photography hobbyist and 3-D movie fan, I can tell you that the ordinary approach is to bring one's stereo lenses closer together the closer you get to your subject, and farther apart the farther away you get. (This is a very broad guiding principle, not a hard-and-fast law that must be followed.) But the filmmakers behind Gatsby seem to have done just the opposite.

In my honest estimation, this film is a waste of your money whether you see it in 2-D or in 3-D. But, as always, your mileage may vary. I will be glad to hear contrary opinions.

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Joe Caruso
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From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 16, 2013 02:57 PM      Profile for Joe Caruso   Email Joe Caruso   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
My entry was free, I found the story lacking depth in character, sauce and no substance as it were - Why bother with 3-d at all, show the story - There was no dimensional effects on the previous 2 filmed adaptations, so why now? - Sorry, I'm old-fashioned, should have been shot b&w, first of all

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Paul Adsett
Film God

Posts: 4815
From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 17, 2013 10:14 PM      Profile for Paul Adsett     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Saw the 3D version tonight, and came to the following conclusions:
The 1974 Robert Redford version is better. Leo does a good job but Redford makes for a far more elegant Gatsby, and the '74 musical track is a joy, as opposed to the crummy rap music of the current version, which is totally out of context for a 1920 period film.
Visually, the new version is often stunning, but a lot of the 3D also looks strangely artificial with vivid super saturated colors (Digital projector settings?). The 3D is often a distraction rather than an aid to what is going on in the scene.
The current film is way too long and at least 30 minutes should be left on the cutting room floor.
Still I think it is worth seeing, but by no means does the film live up to its publicity hype. No academy awards here I'm afraid.

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Joe Caruso
Film God

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From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 18, 2013 08:06 AM      Profile for Joe Caruso   Email Joe Caruso   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thnak you for echoing most of my sentiments - Stupid Hollywood

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Paul Adsett
Film God

Posts: 4815
From: USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted May 18, 2013 10:26 AM      Profile for Paul Adsett     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Has anybody noticed how in 3D movies the actors often seem to have big heads and small bodies in close up shots, and the facial features often seem exaggerated or distorted? I noticed this a lot in Gatsby, in fact with this distortion, combined with overly saturated colors, much of the film seemed to have an almost cartoonish appearance.

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Hugh Thompson Scott
Film God

Posts: 3063
From: Gt. Clifton,Cumbria,England
Registered: Jan 2012


 - posted May 18, 2013 04:07 PM      Profile for Hugh Thompson Scott   Email Hugh Thompson Scott       Edit/Delete Post 
Film scores should compliment the visuals and not be a distraction. The use of rap, is totally wrong,that kind of music
was never even thought of at the time (thank God).One has only
to think of a film like "Chinatown",where the music evoked the
1930s period, I just watched the TV version of "Gatsby",that didn't
exactly stick to the story, but the period flavour was enhanced by
the music score,which was similar to Jerry Goldsmiths.A mistake
often made is in period film,the actors speak in the modern idiom,which immediately dispels the illusion.One has only to
view Wyler's "Ben Hur",when on reading the script, he immediately had the playwright Christopher Fry,rewrite all the
dialogue,to make it sound authentic.Alas the care and attention
present in the classic films seems to have been forgotten in present day cinema,there is a series of programmes on the BBC
that highlights the gaffes that are made in films,and you guessed it,they're all modern day blockbusters.

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Bill Brandenstein
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Posts: 1624
From: California
Registered: Aug 2007


 - posted May 20, 2013 12:01 AM      Profile for Bill Brandenstein   Email Bill Brandenstein   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thomas mentioned the execrable "Romeo and Juliet." More than not I pick movies carefully before taking the plunge, but Luhrman's "Romeo" is one of the few movies I've sat all the way through that was altogether distasteful to me. That "Gatsby" is making this much money is an interesting commentary on the state of our culture, given everyone's negative comments. And your comments are all things I'd likely be highly sympathetic to.

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