8mm Forum


  
my profile | my password | search | faq | register | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» 8mm Forum   » 16mm Forum   » Why a B&W print of a Color movie

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Why a B&W print of a Color movie
Brad Kimball
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1171
From: Highland Mills, NY USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted June 26, 2017 12:48 AM      Profile for Brad Kimball   Email Brad Kimball   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Why would there even be black and white prints of color movies? To what purpose and why would I even want to consider buying it?

 |  IP: Logged

Brian Fretwell
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1785
From: London, UK
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted June 26, 2017 03:05 AM      Profile for Brian Fretwell   Email Brian Fretwell   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I can only think it was for cost. Also I know some TV programs made in colour had B&W prints made for exports to countries with only B&W TV so perhaps films were too and it is those prints you see.

 |  IP: Logged

Maurice Leakey
Film God

Posts: 5895
From: Bristol. United Kingdom
Registered: Oct 2007


 - posted June 26, 2017 03:56 AM      Profile for Maurice Leakey   Email Maurice Leakey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
In the days of 16mm film libraries a hirer was often given the choice of colour or black & white for a feature film. Most people opted for the black & white copies as they were cheaper.
Mobile operator 16mm prints were always black & white.
Before television went into colour, 16mm black & white prints were always supplied to them.

--------------------
Maurice

 |  IP: Logged

Ricky Daniels
Jedi Master Film Handler

Posts: 587
From: London & Kent UK
Registered: Jul 2003


 - posted June 26, 2017 07:52 AM      Profile for Ricky Daniels   Email Ricky Daniels   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Absolutely spot on Maurice
[Wink]

 |  IP: Logged

Winbert Hutahaean
Film God

Posts: 5468
From: Nouméa, New Caledonia
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted June 26, 2017 11:54 AM      Profile for Winbert Hutahaean   Email Winbert Hutahaean   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
I can only think it was for cost.
But in the days of colour film (after 1980s)...the situation is the opposite, B/W films were printed on color stock due to the fact B/W stock were rarer and became more expensive.

So we got all L&H, Three stooges, etc on sephia tones....and I hate it!!

--------------------
Winbert

 |  IP: Logged

Tom Photiou
Film God

Posts: 4837
From: Plymouth U.K
Registered: Dec 2003


 - posted June 26, 2017 02:43 PM      Profile for Tom Photiou   Email Tom Photiou   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
At least they wont fade. [Wink]

 |  IP: Logged

Joe Vannicola
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 108
From: Lincoln, DE, USA
Registered: Feb 2014


 - posted July 03, 2017 12:02 AM      Profile for Joe Vannicola   Email Joe Vannicola   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
A few years ago, I purchased a black and white Castle Films version of Scrub Me Momma With A Boogie Beat at a film convention. While I would have preferred a Tech print of this cartoon, the black and white version was sufficient. I also bought a black and white print of All This And Rabbit Stew. My philosophy is: at least I have these cartoons in my film collection.

--------------------
Joe

 |  IP: Logged

Brian Fretwell
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1785
From: London, UK
Registered: Jun 2014


 - posted July 03, 2017 11:16 AM      Profile for Brian Fretwell   Email Brian Fretwell   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I image the change to using colour stock for B&W prints was due to the large increases in silver prices during the 1980's. It is all recovered during colour processing but a lot is still on the film base (creating the image) in real B&W prints.

 |  IP: Logged

David Ollerearnshaw
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1373
From: Penistone Sheffield UK
Registered: Oct 2012


 - posted July 04, 2017 08:17 AM      Profile for David Ollerearnshaw   Author's Homepage   Email David Ollerearnshaw   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Costs of black and white went up 25% and kept rising. Someone was speculating on the price of silver.
A true black and white films looks much better.

--------------------
I love the smell of film in the morning.

http://www.thereelimage.co.uk/

 |  IP: Logged

Maurice Leakey
Film God

Posts: 5895
From: Bristol. United Kingdom
Registered: Oct 2007


 - posted July 04, 2017 03:22 PM      Profile for Maurice Leakey   Email Maurice Leakey   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
It was the Hunt Brothers (Nelson & William), who in 1979, profited by an estimated $2 billion to $4 billion in silver speculation.

--------------------
Maurice

 |  IP: Logged

Mitchell Dvoskin
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 128
From: West Milford, NJ
Registered: Jun 2008


 - posted July 05, 2017 12:10 PM      Profile for Mitchell Dvoskin   Email Mitchell Dvoskin   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Most B&W prints of color films were struck for television. In the USA, other than NBC that went full color in the late 1950's, the other major networks and almost all independent stations did not go full color until the late 1960's.

There were also B&W prints of color films struck for the home market, although those were generally condensed versions.

In 35mm, many Warner Brothers and MGM films were re-issued in B&W as a second feature for double features. In addition, many color films during WW2 were issued in B&W, as access to the chemicals needed to process color were not available for commercial use.

In 16mm, there were many illegal dupers out there who made unauthorized B&W copies for sale to collectors.

 |  IP: Logged

Brad Kimball
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1171
From: Highland Mills, NY USA
Registered: Jun 2003


 - posted July 11, 2017 09:02 PM      Profile for Brad Kimball   Email Brad Kimball   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I see B&W prints of Hammer Horror classics from time to time and it just kills me why anyone would want to even consider buying a crappy dupe in monochrome of "Horror of Dracula" rather than hold out for a nice color print.

 |  IP: Logged



All times are Central  
   Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic    next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Visit www.film-tech.com for free equipment manual downloads. Copyright 2003-2019 Film-Tech Cinema Systems LLC

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.1.2