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  • Film storage

    Do films treated with FilmGuard need to be stored in a vented film can or will any film can be OK?

  • #2
    Cardboard is best or breathable cans like Bonum. All films need to breath so avoid metal. It also hurts less when they fall off a shelf on you.

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    • #3
      I would also add that tight fitting plastic cans are no better than the metal ones. I always use cardboard boxes too!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Joseph Banfield View Post
        I would also add that tight fitting plastic cans are no better than the metal ones. I always use cardboard boxes too!
        So I’m guessing my longtime method of storage as seen here is not ideal?

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        Last edited by Dave Bickford; July 11, 2022, 03:16 PM.

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        • #5
          At the moment I'm more worried about the effects of the current high temperatures in the UK on pre-lowfade stocks.

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          • #6
            Dave, I would prefer you switch those prints to light cardboard boxes...I've long been a strong advocate towards the original box or a reasonable substitute...you will find they smell like film and not a salad...keep them ever-cool and they will last. Metal cans are a toss-up, as sometimes they are good accompaniments...I have found keeping films (some), and in a cool environment, will last happily long...if you have any odor, use baking soda sheets to absorb them away. That's another story...Shorty

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            • #7
              I think also a lot depends on where you live. Here in the UK I have quite a lot of amateur films (mostly acetate) all in plastic cases going back several decades and all are fine. The UK is lucky in that respect that the temperature is ideal for film storage most of the year.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Graham Sinden View Post
                I think also a lot depends on where you live. Here in the UK I have quite a lot of amateur films (mostly acetate) all in plastic cases going back several decades and all are fine. The UK is lucky in that respect that the temperature is ideal for film storage most of the year.
                You mean we used to be. Least Scotland and Northern are still dark, cool and moist. Hold on just turn the heating off.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Graham Sinden View Post
                  I think also a lot depends on where you live.
                  I live in the northeastern USA. The films have always been stored indoors at room temperature.

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                  • #10
                    Do a search of the forum for "film storage". You will find lots of links to previous discussions. Here are a couple:

                    What really is the absolute best storage container?

                    Preparing film for long term storage in freezer?

                    Everybody has a favorite method and every method has it's critics. The only methods I would fully trust come from organizations that specialize in film preservation.

                    The upshot? Ignore this post and do your own research.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the links Ed Gordon. It's only been in the last few years that I've though about long-term preservation of our family films. They've held up quite well so far, and I would like to keep it that way.

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                      • #12
                        Always cardboard but what I do now for the very small 8mm films i have is always in loose - thin - pillow cases it works equally well for 16mm...they completely breathe and don't gather dust. keep your temperature obviously as cool as you can.

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                        • #13
                          I also recommend cardboard boxes for film storage. I've been using white boxes sold by Splicit Reel Audio Products for $2.95. They are designed for 7" reel to reel audio tape, but work just as well for 8mm film because of their size. They are also constructed very well, and hinged. The other product I use for each film is movie film protectant discs. These pressure sensitive disc feature corrosion intercept technology. They absorb gases and act as a barrier for film inside the enclosed canister or cardboard box. They stick to inside lid or bottom portion of the cardboard box. They are suppose to last up to 40 years. I've been cleaning, and lubricating my films with Filmguard for about 6 years now. I have not noticed any issues concerning storage, etc. Here's a few links and photos of the above products.

                          ​​​​​​https://www.momentcatcherproductions...ator_p_43.html

                          ​​​​​​https://www.splicit.com/Audio-Reel-S...x-p/wrb007.htm

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