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Eumig sound projectors in general

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  • Eumig sound projectors in general

    Just looking for opinions on Eumig projectors in general. Good? Bad? Mediocre? Also, what were some of the newest model numbers? I have a Sound S910 (one of the oddballs with concentric reels). I'm generally happy with it despite an issue with lens adjustment and it sounds a million times better than my Sankyo 762 that apparently needs an electronics overhaul (I haven't run film through my Sankyo 500 for comparison yet, although the amp sounds quiet). Anyway...I see a lot of Eumigs on eBay. I thought I might buy one more just because, like most of us, I want to have a "spare" projector (or three) "just in case". LOL

    In general, are there any eBay sellers in the USA that are highly recommended for selling projectors in good shape?

  • #2
    Eumig's in general are excellent high quality projectors. The 700 and 800 series are extremely robust, but the audio hum level can be detectable at normal playback sound levels on the 800's. The 900 series are not as robust with some of the plastic parts overstressed and susceptible to breaking. The sound quality on the stereo models 926/938/940 is superb, about the best you will ever hear on super 8. The 938 is the one to get, if you can find one. The coaxial reel models 900 thru 929 are best avoided All models benefit from the use of high quality zoom or prime large aperture lenses.

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    • #3
      I just love my Eumig 824. Dual gauge with many extras from the earlier models.
      super 8 database, eumig 824 sonomatic (filmkorn.org)‚Äč

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      • #4
        I agree with Paul, Eumig's are definitely high quality projectors! My two favorites are the Eumig Mark S Super 8 projector from the late 60's, and the Eumig mark S 709 which I just recently bought. The interesting thing about the 709 is this was Eumig's first dual gauge sound machine. When it was released around 1968 Ivan Watson, a publisher and writer with Movie Maker magazine, absolutely loved it! The early Eumig sound machines are very robust and built to last. Two things that usually need addressed with all Eumig projectors are new motor mounts, and the rubber disc drives need a good clean, and reconditioning. Both are easy to do, and most Eumig's will play like new once these remedies are completed.

        What are the advantages with the early Eumigs! Twist to focus lenses, semi auto-loading film transport which will never eat a film, robust tube amplifiers, cheap 100 watt halogen bulb in conjunction with a condenser lens for added brightness. That's just a small list of things that make these a great projector! And they are fun, and easy to use. Below I am including a photo of the Eumig Mark S 709 I just recently purchased. This projector was listed as new in the box. When I opened the flap and pulled this machine out, I could not believe how pristine this thing was! When I pulled the rear cover off, and checked the rubber discs, there was no wear or signs of use. It is now in the process of getting new motor mounts, which will be completed once they arrive. Anyways I am rambling now ha. Another member on here by the name of Joseph Banfield also swears by these early Eumigs. In fact it was his advise to purchase one of the early machines...

        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          I too agree that those earlier Eumig sound projectors still excellent machines . I much prefer using those valve / tube amplifier ones to the later solid state transistor ones . There is less hum on the sound and that semi automatic threading is a plus point in my opinion . Even though i own Eumig 710 D and a Eumig Sonomatic 824 i prefer using my early Eumig Mark S Standard 8mm and Eumig Mark S Super 8mm projectors .

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          • #6
            Originally posted by David Hardy View Post
            I too agree that those earlier Eumig sound projectors still excellent machines . I much prefer using those valve / tube amplifier ones to the later solid state transistor ones . There is less hum on the sound and that semi automatic threading is a plus point in my opinion . Even though i own Eumig 710 D and a Eumig Sonomatic 824 i prefer using my early Eumig Mark S Standard 8mm and Eumig Mark S Super 8mm projectors .
            I once had a Eumig Mark 810D and hated it! That thing was a real film eater. I tried everything to get it to work but it just continued to eat film. Never once has that happened with these early Eumigs.

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            • #7
              David, did Shane pay you to say that? But naturally I agree with both of you regarding those early vacuum tube sound projectors from Eumig. One thing that was not mentioned is when running Super 8 sound film on these machines is that if you add a couple of extra frames to your lower loop sound chatter will disappear completely...and that can't be done on any later transistorized Eumig machines!

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              • #8
                ...and also if you want to remove a film halfway through projection on those early machines it's a simple affair...open the clips on the sprocket, pull the gate and slide out the film. On the transistorized models you will have to disassemble the sound heads to remove a film and the heads will be dangling in mid air by those very fragile tiny wires like a dingleberry.

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                • #9
                  Joseph no Shane certainly did not pay me to say say that but i wish he had . I have to watch my cashflow now that i have retired .
                  I have always thought highly of the earlier sound Eumigs since i was a young lad in the 1960's early 70's .
                  I have never really been that keen on fully automatic threading machines on any gauge .

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                  • #10
                    Shane yes even my good old , purchased from new away back in the day Eumig 710D has had a bit of a nasty habit of being a film auto-shredder from time to time for no apparent reason . Even when there are no bends , kinks or tears in the film leaders when loading . I always keep the same amount of pressure on the film threading key .

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                    • #11
                      All of which raises the question as to why Eumig messed around with a perfectly good design.

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                      • #12
                        Paul that is a question i too have asked many times . Eumig could easily have made all of their 700 and 800 series projectors based on the semi auto thread designs of the previous ones .

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by David Hardy View Post
                          Shane yes even my good old , purchased from new away back in the day Eumig 710D has had a bit of a nasty habit of being a film auto-shredder from time to time for no apparent reason . Even when there are no bends , kinks or tears in the film leaders when loading . I always keep the same amount of pressure on the film threading key .
                          There are several posts here that I will respond to instead of 3 separate ones. Joseph, your comment made me laugh as always. If they only knew how much fun we have in our private messages LOL. Your post about correcting the sound chatter with these early Eumig's is something I wasn't aware of, very interesting indeed! I agree, removing film halfway through projection is an easy task with these great machines. In fact, I tried this out for myself after I purchased the Eumig Mark S Super 8 projector. It took less than a minute to get the film out from the sprockets, and the rest of the film path.

                          David, it's nice to hear your praise for these early Eumig's. For whatever reason, they don't get the same love here as the later Eumig 800's, etc. After talking with Joseph, earlier in the year, I decided on the Mark S Super 8 only machine, and haven't looked back since! Not once has that machine tried to eat film or other mishaps. I had started with a Eumig Mark M, which is a fully auto-loading machine. That particular projector started to become a film eater from time to time. I narrowed it down to the area below the gate as the culprit. As you know the area below the gate on the early Eumigs is void of any channels that may cause a film to become lodged. Just recently, I purchased the new in the box Mark 709 that I pictured above. I ran one film through it last week, and like the Mark S it was a joy to use! So yeah I am not a fan of auto-loaders after using these earlier Eumigs.

                          Paul, I have often wondered why Eumig messed with such a good design! My hunch is as other manufacturers began to make full auto-loading machines, Eumig felt the pressure to do the same thing. It was the lazy man's dream come true when every projector became so, well automatic. I never use to think much about these issues, and always dealt with projectors that would occasionally eat the leader to bits. But once I owned an early Eumig there was no looking back. Paul I know your love for the early Bolex 18-5, and I also think this was a great design! At least the first series Regular 8 machine was probably their best!

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                          • #14
                            y
                            My hunch is as other manufacturers began to make full auto-loading machines, Eumig felt the pressure to do the same thing.
                            Ah yes, the pressure of market forces and bean counters on engineering decisions - I know it well! Probably the same group of villains that forced the design of the ill-conceived coaxial reel design on the Eumig 900 thru 930 series. A totally unnecessary concept and a debacle of engineering. I'm sure if Eumig's wizard engineers had been listened to, the 800 and 900 series would have been firmly based on the ground breaking Mark S and 700 series. Just imagine the Eumig stereo 938/940 having the robust build of the 700's and the semi- auto threading and all the accompanying advantages noted above by Shane, Joseph and David. Look at Shane's picture above and imagine that machine with 150 watt lighting, the stunning recording console and superb stereo sound quality of the 938, and 800ft reel capacity What a machine that would have been! Eumig had all the ingredients in place to produce such a machine. And they could have included the banana's as well!
                            Last edited by Paul Adsett; October 25, 2022, 06:45 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Excellent work horses and, in my opinion, very kind to my film collection. When I want to preview a film, I go right to my Eumig 926 stereo. Now, my interest has been perked! Could someone provide photos of the rubber drives and how to clean them? I am embarrassed to say that I have never cleaned the rubber drives, and perhaps that is why the speed is sometimes sluggish?

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