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Can this be removed from a Eumig Projector?

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  • Can this be removed from a Eumig Projector?

    The Eumig Mark M Super 8 projector, I recently purchased, has a large glass cover, refer to photo below. I am wondering if it's safe to remove it to allow more light to reach the film? It really seems to hinder the light in some regards. I would assume it's there to protect the film when the selector is moved to the stop position, light on? Am I right in thinking this?

    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    Shane, I don't know about this glass but if you need in some exceptionnal occasions (because it's not recommended on the long go), you can change the voltage selector. Since you live in the US, what follows has be adapted : in Europe, before (I think) 1986, the standard voltage was 220 v. So, as already explained in other threads, you may already know that, the voltage selectors of the projectors were set on 230 v or 240 v to save the lamp. On the Eumig, you can set it on 220 v, so when 220 was the norm, you could increase the light without really risking anything by using the 220 v machine on the 220 v domestic electrical net. Now, the voltage coming from the wall is 230 v (and, I think 240 v in the UK), so by putting the selector on 220 v (230 in the UK if I'm correct by assuming they have 240 v, there), you get a (slightly) brighter lamp (that will last less longer than normal). Some people say it's not a problem to put an extra 10 v on the projector, but I personnally think that if all the makes used to set their projectors on a higher voltage that the actual one, they was probably another reason that just trying to extend the bulbs lives (but I may be wrong).

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Dominique De Bast View Post
      Shane, I don't know about this glass but if you need in some exceptionnal occasions (because it's not recommended on the long go), you can change the voltage selector. Since you live in the US, what follows has be adapted : in Europe, before (I think) 1986, the standard voltage was 220 v. So, as already explained in other threads, you may already know that, the voltage selectors of the projectors were set on 230 v or 240 v to save the lamp. On the Eumig, you can set it on 220 v, so when 220 was the norm, you could increase the light without really risking anything by using the 220 v machine on the 220 v domestic electrical net. Now, the voltage coming from the wall is 230 v (and, I think 240 v in the UK), so by putting the selector on 220 v (230 in the UK if I'm correct by assuming they have 240 v, there), you get a (slightly) brighter lamp (that will last less longer than normal). Some people say it's not a problem to put an extra 10 v on the projector, but I personnally think that if all the makes used to set their projectors on a higher voltage that the actual one, they was probably another reason that just trying to extend the bulbs lives (but I may be wrong).
      I have the projector set to 110 volts and 60 cycle. Yes your right a lower voltage makes for a brighter projection. However, this glass piece seems to even change the color temp on screen. I'll wait to see what others say but I think it's safe to say it can be removed. The distance between the bulb and film seems adequate enough.

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      • #4
        Just did some searching at Van Eck's website. Here's a Eumig Mark DL that looks to be converted to a standard halogen. The glass piece has been removed.

        Click image for larger version

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        • #5
          I would suggest it's a condenser lens.
          This is to concentrate the light onto the small film aperture. The mirror behind the lamp being unable to do this by itself.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Maurice Leakey View Post
            I would suggest it's a condenser lens.
            This is to concentrate the light onto the small film aperture. The mirror behind the lamp being unable to do this by itself.
            Thanks that makes sense! So it's possible I could get a enough light with it removed? I may just try it out. If it doesn't I'll put it back in.

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            • #7
              You could try it, but I doubt if it will work. It is there for a purpose.
              All early projectors had a condenser lens and a mirror.

              The Value of Condenser Lenses in Projection Systems - Knight Optical

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Maurice Leakey View Post
                You could try it, but I doubt if it will work. It is there for a purpose.
                All early projectors had a condenser lens and a mirror.

                The Value of Condenser Lenses in Projection Systems - Knight Optical
                Thanks Maurice! I think I'll just keep it in place. I bought a different lens which should give me better light. So I'll wait for that to arrive later in the month.

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                • #9
                  I know that in slide projectors the reflector produces an image of the filament just over the actual filament which the condenser lens used to not only give more light but produce more even illumination at the aperture. If this is so without it there would be a great drop in brightness without the lens as none of the light would be focused on the film plane let alone reducing in diameter to fit through the front element of the projection lens. The reflector not working in the same fashion as that in the one in the conversion you showed.

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                  • #10
                    Shane you could convert it to Dichroic lamp but not being designed for such a lamp consider additional lamp cooling.

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                    • #11
                      I think Eumig put it there for a purpose to help transferer the light correctiy into the lens, before the days of modern lamps with the built in mirror. At the end of the day its a 1960's design based on earlier decades tech, and not a 1970s one. Perhaps it may be better to purchase a later Eumig using more up to date lamps?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Martin Davey View Post
                        I think Eumig put it there for a purpose to help transferer the light correctiy into the lens, before the days of modern lamps with the built in mirror. At the end of the day its a 1960's design based on earlier decades tech, and not a 1970s one. Perhaps it may be better to purchase a later Eumig using more up to date lamps?
                        This is more of a secondary projector so I'll hold off on any upgrades. The Eumig 1.0 lens I ordered might just do the trick. It really is just a matter of increasing the light by a small fraction. Even with the 1.4 lens it's not terrible. The Elmo FPC-8 that produces 150 watts, and fitted with a Bolex 20mm prime lens is my main machine for home movies. I really do like the build quality of this older Eumig design. The twist focusing is also very precise and I really like that too. It held focus for the entire reel. The Elmo's focus drifts from time to time but it's not too much of a big deal. I tend to get too "heady" with this hobby LOL.

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                        • #13
                          So I decided to go back and take a second look at the bulb, and the condenser lens. The condenser lens was extremely dirty. I cleaned it well and realigned the bulb itself. I projected a movie, and wouldn't you know it's brighter, and more crisp. I have to wonder if the dirt was somehow making the light scatter, before most of it was hitting the lens? Anyways, the projected image is damn near as bright as my Elmo, go figure! The Eumig 1.4 lens doesn't look so bad now that everything is up to specs!

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                          • #14
                            Shane, you shouldn't touch a thing because that system uses the excellent FCR lamp with condenser light lenses in front of the lamp and a built in reflector behind the lamp. Those two black levers that are underneath the lamp assembly allow accurate focusing of the lamp as well. One lever moves the lamp itself slightly forward or back, and the other lever moves it slightly to the right or left to achieve the brightest image possible. That FCR lamp system is better than the later cheaper system that was used in their later series. Not only that but those lamps are super cheap and readily available too because they are still used in high grade scientific instruments such as microscopes. There is also a special FCR lamp that is rated at 2,000 hours of life although slightly less bright. The normal FCR lamp with 50 hours rated life can be found for as little as 3 Euros each online!

                            Also when you change out your lens to the faster one you have bought you will notice an even brghter image than you are experiencing now.

                            The Eumig 1,4 lens is in my opinion a highly underated lens. I've always said I personally prefer that particular lens to the more commonly found 1,3 that most machines shipped with. The 1,4 always seems to project a whiter crispier image with beautiful contrast and tends to mask edge focusing issues with slightly warped film. Or at least that has been my experience.

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                            • #15
                              The condensor lens does many things but one of them is aquiring layers of dirt from the surrounding environment. The cleaning of both faces of this lens is quite often missed when home cleaning and servicing along with the heat filter etc on many projectors. The fan draws air in from the surrounding environment and circulates about the glasswork. In the good old days when we were allowed to smoke, nicotene was the biggest culprit actually turning the glass yellow with baked on detritus. In some cases just cleaning the light channel and the glass in it can increase the light output by 50%. Oh and dont forget to clean the lamp itself and set the "Hotspot" as Joseph dscribes.

                              Once done correctly this should last for about 6 months or so dependent on local Enviroment.

                              Click image for larger version

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