8mm Forum


  
my profile | my password | search | faq | register | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» 8mm Forum   » 16mm Forum   » Which is Better?

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Which is Better?
Scott Mallory
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 146
From: Montreal, QC
Registered: Jan 2011


 - posted October 07, 2011 10:50 PM      Profile for Scott Mallory   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Mallory   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Which is better for storing a print on and as a take-up reel-plastic or metal? Can the metal scratch the film when it sometimes makes that awful scraping noise?

--------------------
Scott

 |  IP: Logged

Gerald Santana
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1060
From: Cottage Grove OR
Registered: Dec 2010


 - posted October 08, 2011 10:52 AM      Profile for Gerald Santana   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Hi Scott,

My favorite choice for storing 16mm prints are in fiber cases that can be stored upright on a shelf close to the screening room with the labels out. I have many in cans and in cases, those are harder to store do to weight, size, and for support, those I store closer to the ground and on shelves with many slats (to prevent from rolling off). I put a label on the side of the can to be able to read the title easily.

I prefer plastic reels to eliminate weight but, the projector is built to handle the capacity size reel anyway. If there is scraping on the metal reel, I usually add a little alcohol and mineral oil to a Pec Pad and wipe the edge of the reel on both sides to deter friction (which may scratch the film). If the reel is terribly warped, it's better to replace it in my opinion, than to risk damage to the print.

--------------------
http://lostandoutofprintfilms.blogspot.com/

 |  IP: Logged

Simon Wyss
Film Handler

Posts: 78
From: Äsch, Switzerland
Registered: Apr 2009


 - posted October 09, 2011 12:05 PM      Profile for Simon Wyss   Email Simon Wyss   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Keep all metal away from film.

Metals can act as catalysts for accelerated chemical decomposition. Best is wood, then plastic, organic composites that eventually absorb acids and or fumes leaving film. Molecular sieves are therefore put into cans, available from Eastman Kodak, for instance.

Steel reels can become rusty, and rust is very abrasive. It must not be trapped in convolutions. The steel covering tin is very active as catalyst. Lacquered or anodized aluminum is less harmful. Check with a magnet if steel or alum.

On the other hand, plastic canisters should not close too tightly. Air-seal enclosure is not good.

Store film horizontally at +4 to +5 degrees Celsius or at least below 20 degrees and in dry air.

 |  IP: Logged

Scott Mallory
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 146
From: Montreal, QC
Registered: Jan 2011


 - posted October 10, 2011 01:33 PM      Profile for Scott Mallory   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Mallory   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks for the great information guys.

--------------------
Scott

 |  IP: Logged

Adrian Winchester
Film God

Posts: 2941
From: Croydon, London, UK
Registered: Aug 2004


 - posted October 10, 2011 06:02 PM      Profile for Adrian Winchester     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I have films on both plastic and metal reels. My preference would be a plastic reel in good condition but plastic seems more prone to compression. At least with metal you can bend it away from the film, whilst with plastic it's more difficult to rectify. When it comes to take up reels, I don't think you can't beat the 2000' Eiki auto reels.

--------------------
Adrian Winchester

 |  IP: Logged

Lee Mannering
Film God

Posts: 3216
From: The Projection Box
Registered: Nov 2006


 - posted October 11, 2011 05:17 AM      Profile for Lee Mannering     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Adrian. I tend to favour the usual Cecolite 'Made in England' reels YAY! With features I pack thick card between reels so that the spools dont slop about inside the boxes. If a film is less than 1600ft on a large reel I put a card spacer around the outside to stop the reels bending out of shape and always store boxes on end. Done so for years and works a treat at least for me.

 |  IP: Logged

Dino Everette
Phenomenal Film Handler

Posts: 1535
From: Long Beach, CA USA
Registered: Dec 2008


 - posted October 12, 2011 02:08 AM      Profile for Dino Everette     Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
This is one of those fun, yet no easy answer, questions where there is NO definitive answer....The only pure answer would be a straight reel is the best reel.... Both metal and plastic have there benefits.. As Adrian said the metal reels are easiest to alter and bend away from scraping the film if you notice a problem during a screening...

It often baffles me that most collectors avoid the best solution to this like the plague...which is a split reel, and cores...... the majority of archives store their films on plastic cores and then use only one or two perfectly maintained split reels for projection. This way you get the best of both worlds.... A nice sturdy metal reel for projecting and then you remove the metal for storage...

Another thing to remember is in regards to stacking

Cores - horizontal
reels - Vertical

that way you won't damage film or reels.

Final note since it was brought up....I would actually advise against wood shelving for the following reason... I once had an air conditioning malfunction that occurred unnoticed over a weekend..It caused a moist and humid environment to form, which actually caused a mold outbreak..The thing that made it worse was the wood shelves.. As the air continued to circulate the mold went airborne and landed and spread quite rapidly throughout the wood, and then the films... A good industrial metal shelving is always going to be better than wood.

--------------------
"You're too Far Out Miss Lawrence"

 |  IP: Logged

Scott Mallory
Expert Film Handler

Posts: 146
From: Montreal, QC
Registered: Jan 2011


 - posted October 12, 2011 11:47 AM      Profile for Scott Mallory   Author's Homepage   Email Scott Mallory   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Thanks for all the tips everybody.

--------------------
Scott

 |  IP: Logged



All times are Central  
   Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic    next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Visit www.film-tech.com for free equipment manual downloads. Copyright 2003-2019 Film-Tech Cinema Systems LLC

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.3.1.2